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Nubian

PTO generator

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Nubian
I am looking at a Pincor PTO generator made by Pioneer Gen-E-Motor corp, it's a 20K and requires a 40hp diesel my question is will my 18hp run it safely.the owner said he ran it with his JD 970 which he says is not 40hp. all i need is 10K does half the HP = half the output. and if i run it at half the output will it hurt the generator. is there a difference between a 18hp running a pto at 540rpm and a 40hp doing the same? Thanks Eddy

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Kent
Eddy, Are you sure you have a 540 RPM PTO? Or, is it the 2000 RPM PTO like the ones that came on the AC 720/Simplicity Pow'rMax? I don't know -- that's why I'm asking... Kent The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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Nubian
did i forget to mention, I am the proud new owner of a MINTY Deutz-Allis 5215 4WD 3cyl 18 hp Toyosha diesel with only 420 hours on it, 60" belly deck, Cat 1 3pt hitch,ROPS and yes Kent 540 rear pto. UCD is my equation correct or safe half the HP = half the output? Eddy

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UCD
The hp of the tractor has nothing to do with the out put of the genarator. Just at full load on the generator your tractor would be working very hard. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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CarlH
In an ideal world the conversion is 746 watts per horsepower or approximately 1 kilowatt per horsepower. However, our tractors do not produce the engine's rated horsepower at the PTO for a number of reasons. The engine's advertised rating is often unobtainable as installed and there are various transmission losses. There are also conversion inefficiencies in the generator/alternator. The rule of thumb is 2 engine horsepower per 1 kilowatt output of the generator/alternator. If you underpower the alternator, the electrical output (in terms of current and voltage) depends on the electrical load applied. As the load increases beyond the engine's capacity, the engine will load down, RPM decreases (AC frequency likewise) and you will get no more electrical power (current times voltage) from the generator than the engine is capable of less the transmission/conversion losses. Eventually the engine will stall from a sufficient overload.

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Dadsy98
Generators are ran at 3600 RPM . this gives you an AC voltage at 60 cycles or hertz. Since they are designed this way you need to run your tractor at the generator's specified RPM. Your PTO speed may be different. When you get all set up use a frequency counter to establish your engine speed. don't worry about voltage output. this will be very close to what you need. Steve

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Dutch
Generators are NOT all the same. Some are designed to run at 3600rpm, others at 1800rpm, others at other rpms. Engineers determine how much INPUT (engine) power is required to achieve the generator's maximum OUTPUT. Ideally, the engine should match the generator. If a smaller engine is used, the generator "should" perform satisfactorily "up to" the engine's capability. When the demand on the generator exceeds the engine's capability, rpms will drop, and generator output will decrease. A generator simply places a "load" on an engine, not unlike a mower deck. A 7hp engine may be fine for cutting short dry grass, but when you attempt to cut long, wet, thick grass the 7hp engine may "bog down" or stall.

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