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Dutch

PAINT or paint ...... ???

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Dutch
I've finished all the mechanical repairs, and modifications (for now). I'm ready to paint. I was going to take the tractors completely apart (again) and do a "better than factory" automotive quality refinish with new decals (was even going to install welting between the dash and frame to eliminate the rust problem they all seem to have in that area). Now I've got second thoughts. My tractors WORK. I don't have them for show or parades. They get DIRTY, MUDDY, SCRATCHED, & NICKED. So, I'm thinking, why throw time and money away, get aggrevated with every future blemish, and spend many hours washing, waxing, touching-up and trying to maintain appearances. Maybe I should just steam clean them and give them a quick "spray can" job. What do you guys think?

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CleanBee
Dutch, you sound a lot like how I am. I totally took my 110 apart and rebuilt it to be mechanically sound. I wanted to drive it for a year and check for any leaks and tweek it. Only after it is mechanically perfect am I going to tear it down again, blast allmost everything, prime, paint, and polish. I think you should go for the finishing touch but keep in mind that a few new scratches will be happen and be OK. The scratches will show the character "you" put into it. Dan

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MPH
Herb, your delemia is why I decided to strip my B112 down while I was waiting to bgb box parts, I knew I would never 'get around' to tearing it down that far just to paint it. If your gonna work 'em like they were built for, looking nice is good enough I think. Restored is a whole different ball game..MPH

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BigSix
Dutch: With all due respect to Dan, his way is nice if one has the time, $ and inclination, but then you're stuck with that problem you mention of feeling the pain of every blemish to your "artwork". Although it's great to have done that work, it's very sad to see it come undone, IMHO. So I have a "Occam's Razor" (?) type of suggestion: Do most of them as you and MPH suggest, but pick ONE to go "all out on." If after doing all the others "quick and dirty," as I like to call it, as it helps me keep from going nuts on them, you still have the inclination to go "all out," do so, on the last one. But don't pick one you really like, or one you currently use a lot, or one you can't live without, because if you're like me, you won't us it anymore. And you ARE like me...I saw the pickup you drove until recently, and it's like my '88 F150--I don't have to worry about it and it is a comfort to me. It is r-e-l-a-x-i-n-g to drive that truck. Mechanically sound, doesn't burn oil, or rattle, it can (and does) tow my boat most of the way to Canada. But it's "ripley," believe me. Battle scarred. Mostly by previous neglectors, but when I found, for example, one major difference of driving a "long box" vs. my '81 "Shorty," I wasn't upset for more than an hour. The difference between the two trucks (the practical effect of a longer wheelbase) was discovered when the 2' diameter oak tree at the end of the driveway did not step out of the way as I turned the longer pickup as sharply as I used to turn the shortbox. So when I was surprised by that sickening, sideways "kabump" as I ran the tree down the r/h side of the box, (you know, like if you mow too close to the edge of a curb or something, and the rear wheel of the tractor jumps back into line behind the tractor?) the (actually very minor) damage was not unduly upsetting. Had it been my restored truck, (which is unlikely as I drive it very carefully, when I do drive it) I probably would have "spit the bit," as they say. I basically restored my '72 F-100, when I was a kid. Unlike all those "Boy I wish I'da kept that blah blah blah...I did keep it, largely due to the generosity of my father, with his storage space. But I don't DRIVE it, for a number of reasons, but one being, if I don't drive it, it doesn't deteriorate. There's less than 68,000 miles on it.The '72 is not relaxing. Every blemish is real pain. I used to repaint heavy equipment, after highschool, and I know exactly what you're talking about with the steam job, a quick DA'ing of what's accessible, take care of the rust, a quick masking, a prime and scuff, and shoot it. If it were me, and you only need a front blade tractor, my suggestion of a 2012 (or substitute your favorite model HERE) might be a good resto candidate: if you're only plowing snow with it, you're not off in the brush, or using it as a workbench, or a railroad tie mover, etc.... So it's counter-intuitive in that your showpiece would be out in inclement weather, but snow is fairly dry, and how often would you actually need to use it? I hope you tell us what you think, and decide.... Peter

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Scotmo
My own opinion is keep it painted nice(touch up its battle wounds) but by no means ever be afraid to scratch it. Work it and enjoy it! Mechanical things must not upset me.(repeat 100 times a day)

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roma3112
Here are my two cents: If you have the time and are sure this tractor is in sound mechanical shape, by all means do the best job on dissassambling/painting that you can (or you have the inclination to do) Trust me from experience, once you but this machine into service the tendency is to not want to tear it apart to do a paint job. In my case i am lucky in that i have more than 1 machine and i have enough room to keep one in various states of repair. If you have the patience and like the machine do a good job. I have had good results with the "rustoleum" primers/paints, as well as factory touch-up paint (for the finish coat (s) ) Stay away from the $1.99 a can paints, I find that they have more solvents than paint and getting smooth even coverage with them (without runns) is hard. Good luck with your project, and most importantly, ENJOY THE MACHINE

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arjr111
Dutch, all of mine are spraycan, paint jobs. Like you say, they are used for work. A few of the machines, I have purchased, had some really awful, spraycan jobs, looked like who did it and ran! And, I think this caused the tractors a little "embarrassement." But, they "felt" better after repainting ; ) ......Art

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SmilinSam
Dutch, I've had cars before that I waxed and polished every week . Kept them nice. But, I didn't feel free to drive them "everywhere". No gravel roads, no bad weather, etc. Didn't keep any of them either. With the tractors I avoid this and don't even go for the "show" quality paint jobs. I just do a limited disassemby, wash em good, run a wire cup on a 4" angle grinder lightly over them to smooth up the surface a little , degrease with another good wash and give em a few good coats of paint to "brighten them up. After a few scratches and mars, it all evens out and you don't notice the imperfections from a quickie prep job so bad. Best of all I feel like I can take em out and work em as hard as I want.... Sam

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AGCO918
HERB: RESTORE,RESTORE THEM. You get my point from the get go.COMPLETEILY tear them apart,replace anything that is leaking,or plain worn out.power wash all the gunk off,and then have it sandblasted. THE next thing i would do is get a fill and sand primer,sand between 2 0r 3 coats and then put a good paint or what ever you choose to use and then let it cure for a couple weeks and then clearcoat it and decal it.YES it is a lot of work but my next tractor i get to restore will be done in these steps as i done my WD ALLIS CHALMERS about 15yrs plus ago.THE only thing i didnt do was clear coat it.I used dupont centari paint.YES it is a lot of time and work but if you are going to do it do it right not half done. YOU will get more pride and joy out of it thise way on my oppion because it will be better than factory. AGCO918 CHAD E SHAFER CHAD E SHAFER(AGCO918)

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Kent
Dutch, I chose the spray can route because I WORK the tractors, as you stated. If I were building a "show" tractor or a "pleasure" tractor, then by all means I'd take the time and $$ to do it as nicely as I could. I have a B-1 sitting waiting for that treatment someday. An automotive analogy -- is it to be a "daily driver", a "Sunday-afternoon cruiser" or a "show car" ? My cars and my tractors are daily drivers... My '53 bug, if I can ever get around to it, will be a "Sunday-afternoon cruiser." Kent The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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Guest
I dont see how a guy could have say a 7012 landlord sitting in his barn and not want to work it. Im at the same point as you herb, two tractors disasembled, im going to paint them, clearcoat, and then use them. If you get a "blemish", who cares. Wax the hood and fenders once a year, keep them out of the weather, change the oil, blah blah blah. I consulted with Rich Paquette last winter on this, check out his tractors in the gallery, nice, but as he says, "I use em hard".... Doug

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JOHNP
Dutch, when i got my 7116h my intentions were to re-furbish it. After using the snow blower the mower the dozer blade and now the jbjr i've decided to "maintain" it. Keeping it clean and serviced and not worry about scratching the new paint or running into that tree that always seems to be where it shouldn't. johnp

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Dave-Saratoga
just to be the fly in the ointment- what about if you've got parts on the same tractor that are various shades of orange and various shades of yellow, with some gold thrown in the the underside. what do you do then?

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alleyyooper
If you are going to take the time to paint them then do the best job possiable, with the best matiral you can afford. The paint in most spray cans for a tractor, truck or car is ment for touch up only. Use a hard paint, epoxy on the frame running gear and enamal on the hoods & fenders. then clear coat it so you can use rubbing compound to remove the once in a while scratch. Thats my 2 cents. Ya can throw it back if ya want. Al Al

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Roy
Herb, Show quality is nice and looking good or OK is nice but the bottom line is "does it work?". It all depends upon how much of a perfectionist you are. I enjoy by B-1 because I don't mind crashing the bushes and scratching it up. It just kills me when I see a another scratch on the new Sovereign. Your party. Fix'em up like you want. Cheers,

Roy

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KenK
I really don't see the problem.I got 2 completly restored and 3 to go. No I don't use them when I'm done,I just buy another one or 2 or even 3 to use for my working tractors. Never can have too many.

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Ron_B
Well Dutch you finally came up with a question that is easy to answer.I think you should do nothing less than set a good example for the rest of us. Go the automative quality refinish route.The only way to go with a great fleet of toys like you have.Tell us what you decide. Have a good day.---Ron B

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StinKy
I'm solidly on the working tractor side of the tracks for this one. I've done a good prep job on my 3210-V but am going to go the rattle-can route for the finish. Besides it's condition when I got it was'nt what I'd call a good base for a show tractor. I would want one in better overall shape to take to the Nth degree. If I ever do I would have ONE show grade machine and the rest will be workers (kept clean of course). I have used the high grade paint & primers on it and the parts I've painted so far look nice, no orange peel,runs,or dirt mixed in with the paint. I think a good end result can be obtained with the premiun spray can paints and how fussy you are with your prep will show in the end result. I think I'll clear coat it too. BTW Kent, you left out the most important catagory of cars-----the ubiquitous "BEATER". Without it millions of us wouldnt get to work each day or have something to swear at while underneath it eating dirt & oil. Dick

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alleyyooper
MPH. I am not sure about the clear over epoxy. Ask at the local automotive paint store on that one. People would be surprized at what is the base for a show tractor. I haven't but know of those who hauled stuff out of river banks. Junk back then to stop the river from washing the road out. Now it is one rare big four tractor from the late 20's early 30's. It is just to me any way a waste to put weeks and weeks or in some cases years to find the right tractor, all the parts and all the labor then not make it as perrty as you can afford. I know every one doesn't have a big work shop or all the equipment. Most things can be rented. or trade work with some one else you know. You might have to break down and talk green and yellow some. HEY know why John Deers are green and yellow? So they hide in the grass when a real tractor goes by LOL. Al

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MPH
Al, my local paint store is a NAPA store, most the time they know where the paint cans are on the shelff...Thanks anyway, the paint job was just meant to be a rust preventer after some welding on the hinge brackets anyway..MPH

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ultimatehick
As much as I can I like to keep it as clean as i can. I think the main reason is because i like my stuff to look as new as possable. Also the reason why I keep it so clean is because I mow alot of peoples lawns and I think that it helps if it is clean when they see it.

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