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BrianS

Home Made Loader

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BrianS
I'd like to draw from all of you that have loaders either home-made or store bought. I've been working on plans for a loader, or should I say thinking about working on plans for a loader, for a while now. I have no problems with the mechanics of it but how heavy is too heavy. Can anyone give me any pointers on the tube size to use? I was thinking 2 X 3 X 1/8 wall for the arms to start and maybe 1/8 for the bucket. I want to build it heavy enough to hold up but not over kill. I've seen some nice examples of home-made loaders that people have sent in but it's hard too tell how heavy they are. I know plans are out there but I think designing it would be half the fun. I would like to hear some trials and triumphs of others even if you have a store-bought one and found things that you like or don't like. It might spark some interesting discussion. Thanks Brian

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BigSix
No offense, but isn't 1/8" cross-section too light, given the pressures hydraulics can generate? Even if you're only lifting a few hundred pounds, surely pressures will soar into the thousands when rolling the bucket up, hitting stuff, etc.... I read that lifting a reasonable amount of weight, incorrectly, by bending the back, puts loads up to 11,000 lbs. psi on certain bones. I would think 3/16, at a minimum, is more appropriate. But this is a lay opinion, only.

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Dutch
Peter, That's why engineering is important. The "I" beam supporting the "static" load of your living room floor may be 1/2" thick, while the high tensile frame rails of a truck carrying 40 tons over a bumpy road may be less than 1/4" thick. Tensile strength of material and structural design are VERY important. Ever notice a retractable tape measure? That slight curve to the blade permits the blade to be extended 5'-6'. If the same blade was flat, it probably wouldn't be able to be extended over 2' without collapsing.

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BrianS
The engineering is all important. I'll be spending a good hunk of time on it. I put alot of stock in expertiance too. Thats why I threw this up for discussion. I figured I might head off some pitfalls by hearing about things that didn't work. Thanks for the replys.

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HubbardRA
I am planning to use 2x4, probably 3/16 thick for the arms. 1/8 is plenty in the bucket if you beef the corners, acouple of places in the bottom, and the attachment points. I want to be able to lift more than the tractor can carry. I am designing for a 500lb lift with the bucket at 800lb of hydraulic pressure. I've done some rough calculations and sketches, nothing I could post. By the way, I am going to use a power steering pump on this unit. They work fine, seen them in action. Rod H.

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