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loader specs and dimensions

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I'm looking to build a loader for my big 10,the loader specs and dimensions link seems to be deadended.Any help would be appreciated. This site is amazing!! I've looked all over the web and librarys and haven't found 10% of the info thats posted here. keep up the good work.

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Kent
Just noticed this one, originally posted in the How Do I forum... Here's the L-12 loader specs: http://simpletractors.com/attachments/l-12_specs.htm Here's the L-12 parts manual for pictures: http://simpletractors.com/parts/l-12/l-12_loader.htm Here's the Owner/Operator's manual for the equivalent Simplicity: http://simpletractors.com/operation/515_loader/front_loader_515.htm Sorry that I hadn't noticed this before... The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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Kent
Here's a set of plans that could be modified to fit the later Sovereigns fairly easily, since you could create a cross-member pretty readily. Note that it DOES NOT address the weak point of the bevel gear box being used to connect the front frame with the rear frame rails -- I'd personally be more concerned about this stress point than the front spindles... replacing a broken spindle is minor compared to replacing a broken bevel gear box! http://www.geocities.com/pnfz/GardenTractorLoader.html The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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HubbardRA
Kent, Sorry, but I have to disagree with you about the spindles and the BGB. The loader is in front which means that all of the load pivots on the front axle. This tends to lift the rear off the ground - thus unloading the BGB. Unless you are running massive rear counterbalance weight, I don't think the BGB will be a problem. But I am concerned about spindles. I myself am getting ready to build a loader and also worry about spindles, and the force needed to steer the tractor. I am working on designing a power steering unit. Haven't got that part worked out yet. Rod H.

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Kent
Rod, You certainly have the right to disagree. But, to me the single biggest weak point in the whole Simplicity/Allis design is the bevel gear box (BGB) and how it is used to "tie" the two halves of the tractor together. (In comparison, old Cubs used frame rails front-to-back.) It's common for some of the four bolts in the BGB to work loose and potentially "wallow" out the threads, even without the stress of a loader. The original L-10/L-12/Sim 515 loaders used a complete subframe that "tied" the tractor together from the front axle pivot, the back of the front axle's wishbone, the front frame and the rear frame rails together. It placed any stress on the rear of the tractor to just in front of the rear axle on the frame -- not on the cast bevel gear box. Without such a subframe or something like reinforcing plates to "bridge" the bevel gear box and take up the stress -- IMO, you're just looking for trouble. Daddycat can attest to what can happen -- see his BGB picture below from using his Johnny Bucket hard: I'm not suggesting that the front spindles may not also be a weak point, only that without a subframe or reinforcing plates, the BGB is subject to "catastrophic" failure. And changing a BGB isn't a fun task -- in comparison, replacing a broken spindle would be a breeze.... Also, remember that the factory loaders for these tractors were rated to lift 350lbs to only about 5 feet in the air.... the PFEngineering plans can easily lift 500lb or more, and lift it even higher.... Simply put -- I WOULD NOT put a loader on one of these tractors without a subframe or something bridging the BGB.... My two cents, and likely worth even less! Kent The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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HubbardRA
I'll let you know when I get mine built. I'm putting it on a sears Suburban, cause I want my Wards and AC tractors free for the real work. Besides the Sears has the Hi-Low rear which I don't have on the others and is hard to find. By the way, the BGB bolts work loose easily from weights hung on the back of the tractor. Had that problem with the pulling tractor. Not only the four BGB attachment bolts, but the side plate bolts also came loose. This would be a real problem with a backhoe. Rod H.

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thedaddycat
I'll get pics of the support plates I'm working on posted tomorrow. The span will be from the tranny to the electric lift mounts. Lockwire will keep the bolts tight, but drilling the bolts will take time......

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thedaddycat
OK, here is the new set of support plates in development. They are tack welded to the original plates to keep things lined up while cutting, grinding and drilling the holes. They will span from the tranny to the electric lift mounts. The U shape plates will be bent to fit on either side of the frame cross member that the front of the BGB mounts too. I will then bolt through the support plate and frame side and the U plates. That gives me 6 bolts on each side on the frame end and at least 9 bolts on each side on the tranny end of the support plate. I will add support bars on the inside of the original side plates to help brace the back end of the BGB(where the cover bolts up). The first set of plates is at the top. I decided to go full length instead of just to the back of the BGB. On the topic of hydraulics, I looked in the manual for the B-1 fork lift. The lift cylinder is 1.25"X33", the tilt cylinder is 1.75"X4", and the system is 1250 psi max. It is designed to lift 500 lbs. with up to 10 degree tilt.

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