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SmilinSam

Try not to drewl on your keyboards....

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SmilinSam
Remeber This........ Here it is all revamped........ I rebuilt the grill. All the previuos owner did was to cut the bottom of the hood out and chop a hole in the grill mesh. I think my method was a bit more tasteful. The power steering I had ended up being no good so I opted to extend the wheel bas a bit bu flipping the axle around. It helped both steering and stability. I did have to sacrifice a little by having not being able to turn quite as sharp. Lastly I opted not to hang weights on the wheels, instead I hung a big rectangularpiece of iron under the loader mountin front of the rear wheels and made it to accept a couple of Simplicity collar weights in addition.

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Guest
Very nice Sam! Good work, good thinking. why did you rule out the wheel weights? Dougm

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Kent
O.K., I tried not to drool -- does anyone have a bib, size extra-large???? Nice job, Sam, especially on the grille. It looks like a factory mod. I'll bet the forklift is to unload trailers from the side... Does this mean that the 2012 with loader is ready for a new home, since this one is now fully operational? The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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Cal
How do you keep the Pump from destroying itself with that single cyl. kohler the decal on the hood says 917 which should be a nice smooth 2 cyl. Cal

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SmilinSam
Art, Its WOW!! and then some. I took her out and "played" with her this afternoon. Moved tractor frames, transmissions, and all sorts of stuff around here and there. I even picked up a 738 Broadmoor less the engine. Lifted it to the maximum lift of 5' 8" and didn't even shake the tractor stability, and that was without using the auxillary collar weights.(that rectangular weight weighs almost 100 lbs by itself) Doug, I have the rear wheels spaced out with some spacers original to the L-12 loaders. I don't really want extra weight swinging around way out there on the ends of the axles. I figured to reduce the streeses on my Differential and axle tube a little doing it this way. Dave, Its a standard Kwik-Way self leveling loader. They never made one for the Soveriegn tractors, but someone did a fair job of mounting this one up. When I got the tractor the bevel gear box was literally broken into pieces. The cast gearcase was destroyed from the stress of having the loader out front and a weight box out back and no frame to tie the back of the tractor to the loader frame in front like the original Allis B-series had. I basically repaired the tractor and finished the incomplete engineering job someone else started. Cal, This was originally a 1990 Deutz-Allis 916. That 16hp Kohler single is a nice engine. They use a two piece flxi connector form the engine shaft to the pump shaft. I don't see much for problems with the arrangement, other than its a bit unsightly. I did away with the well battered green tinwork( I have an afobia to "green"anyhow) and replaced it all with tin from the 917 I parted out to use on my HB-116. I like the Allis tin on the later model black frame tractor, gives it a nice contrast. Pat, I never to loan out my tools unless I go with and operate them......... Kent, This thing is going to save a lot of wear and tear on my back. That 2012 is just waiting for a ride to CT............... Thanks all for the compliments, with this one I now retire for the year from "restorations". Gettin burned out on it. I need to get to work on normal maintainince and repairs, the attrition on my "fleet" is starting to add up. Not to mention the house repairs and upkeep.

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powermax_paul
C'mon Sam, yer not gonna retire from restorations. Bet that forklift is for the money yer mak'n on buying and selling parts. LOL Paul

Paul Kjorlie, The Norwegian

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HubbardRA
Sam, Is that a fork lift only, or do I see a quick disconnect unit? Whatever, It is excellent. Wish I had mine built. Got to see if I can get the Wife to let go of a little money so I can get started on mine. I want a toy like Sam has! Can I Please? Rod H.

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SmilinSam
Rod , Its four pins that hold the forklift head on. Takes about 90 seconds to switch from forks to bucket. I need to add some more worklights on it yet, but other than that its done. The forks are bulit so that they will slide back and forth so I can put them closer together or farther apart for a little more versatility. I'm also suprised at how pitching the front wheels out 3" more to the front made made such a difference in steering. Probably improved it by 40%. Paul, No BS, I'm REALLY burned out on the complete tear downs and restore jobs. Done about 5 in the last 9 months, and I'm going to wait till after the first of the year to do any more. Besides, theres no money in restorations and I already have all the tractors I need to use now(that statement in itself may be the sign of a recovering tractor addict) I'll stick with tearing them down and selling parts to the rest of ya'll who are not in recovery yet, and let my kids work on fixing what they want. As a matter of fact Paul, I was strolling down the tool aisles at Lowes and Farm & Fleet the other day and I believe I'll go buy some more woodworking equipment this weekend. Time to go play with some wood for a while.........

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CleanBee
Sam, Woodworking is an excellent hobby. Mostly during the winter. I get my own wood from our land up north, help a friend of mine rough cut it, and I take it from there. Plane, joint, dowel, bicuit, dovetail, router,.....ect. It is really rewarding and a inexpensive alternative to buying the quality funature. I have over 200 board feet of hard maple air dried downstairs right now. Some 2 inch cuts also. My brother does jobs on the side and fully supports the cost of his equipment. His entire basement is one huge shop. If you need any advise on what tools to start with and who makes the best tools for each job, let me know. I have tried alot and can give you an educated opinion. Theres alot to learn about woodworking, how to read the wood and what joints work best for their applications. If you choose to do the more manual route of woodworking it is time consuming but very rewarding. My brother just built a winsor high chair using hand tools. Last year he built a chest cutting all the dove tails by hand also. Dan

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SmilinSam
Dan, In addition to my mower shop, I have a complete furniture shop out on the other end of the properrty. Been building furniture and toys for 10 years +. Havn't done much for 2 years though, been too busy with lawn equipment.LAst thing I built was a oak china cabinet for my wife. I also built a few pieces to match a 100 year old bedroom set once among many other things. I get my wood from our familys wood business where I work. Logs to sawmill to drying to selling finished product out of a retail store on location. Slowly moving into custom trim production too. Ericson Log & Lumber Co. New WIndsor, IL. 309-667-2146. My little shop has Table saw, band saw, drill press, wide drum sander, shaper table, planer, jointer, stationary and portable bicuit joiners, mortising machine, radial saw, lathe, spindle sander, dust collection, plus a host of other smaller tools. I need to buy some portable equipment to work in the house and out in the other buildings when I need to , thats what I'm in the mood to shop for. I also need to replenish my supply of antique hand tools. I have sold a few larger pieces, but in general I have a hard time with buyers who don't want to pay much for custom work. They all seem to be used to the "dime store" prices and I'm not willing to work at it for $2-$3 an hour. I once built a toy radial saw on legs for the Wood Magazine build a toy contest. Didn't win anything( pretty much same people won every year, makes you think it was rigged or something) but it was the toy that brought the most money at the auction that year, over $600 I think. My favorite project was a toy Independce class aircraft carrier that I scaled down from line drawings. Had one open side and working flight deck elevators. It can be fun at times. Sam

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UCD
Sam Sure your not Norm Abrams in disquise. May be you should put the things you make on Ebay. We have a guy on the canadian side from me that makes a toy kitchen wood stove that looks so real you want to build a fire in it and start cooking on it. He gets over $700 for it. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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CleanBee
Wow, you are really set up. My brother doesnt even have a wide drum sander or the stationary buscuit machine. Suprised you have trouble with people paying enough. It might be your location. He lives near Gurnee Ill. and there is a high demand for custom cabnetry with all the 300+ thousand dollar homes being built. He doesnt have enough time for the demand, he does an outstanding job, but he really wants to keep it more of a hobby for right now. I am just a novice compared to him, and you. Sure is fun and rewarding though and a nice change from iron. If I had to pick between the smell of fresh cut oak or burnt gas while setting carb, the oak wins hand down. Dan

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Dutch
Since this thread has veered off to woodworking……….. About 15 years ago my wife fell in love with a $8,999.00 entertainment center. “Unfortunately” (thank God) it was too high to fit where she wanted to put it. A few months later the store had a clearance sale. I bought the top sections (3) for $100. I’m not a woodworker, but I cobbled together some particle board, glued on some veneer, added a few moldings and pressed cravings, stained and finished. Cost was under $150. Sorry for the quality of the pix, I’m still using my $40 camera.

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