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Dutch

Hydraulic Alternative

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Dutch
For those of you who would like a power lift, don't overlook electric linear actuators. Simplicity offered an electric lift (Saginaw Performance Pak), and they work great. Linear actuators are readily available in various lengths (satellite dishes use them). They are less expensive than a hydraulic system. Installation is far easier too. No pump, valves, belts, hoses. Just a switch and some wire and you're set to power up that blade, dump trailer, etc.

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gretsch
Where can a person buy one (new) that could be easily modified to work on a tractor? The older and very used Simplicity electric lifts are expensive and usually not known to work very well (at least not at this point in their lifespan).

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Dutch
Here's a neat site with info and links about actuators. New actuators are often available from surplus dealers, and eBay. http://www.redrok.com/actuator.htm As for "easily modified", that's a relative term that I can't answer. I suppose it would depend on what a person is trying to power, what actuator is available, and the person's engineering & mechanical abilities.

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arnoldir
I agree that these items can be found and adapted quite nicely. My favorites are the ones from Warner Electric. I got a pair of 1000 pound thrust 8" travel Warners on ebay for $50 each and they list new for almost $400. Plans are for a power lift and angle on my 6216 snowplow. There are several variations in internal construction, some have ACME Thread screws that are rated for about 250lb thrust and 1000lb static load, and the Recirculating Ball Screw type that are good for up to 1000 lb thrust and 3000lb static load. Both versions come with different gear ratios that affect the load and travel speed. Travel can be up to 24" and I have seen them on ebay on ocassion.

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Stoneheartfarm
Okay, this begs a couple of questions. 1. What is the appropriate length actuator? 2. What are they usually listed under on ebay? 3. What kind of switch set up do you use? It doesn't seem like a simple on/off switch would work that well, so I'm assuming there must be some kind of 3 way switching. Not being familiar with dish antennas and their set up, I'm not sure exactly how they work. Steve

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Dutch
Steve, 1. Just like hydraulic cylinders, actuators come in various lengths and capacities. I've seen them with a 1" throw up to 60" and greater. Did you visit the "redrok" link above? Select the actuator that will suit the job you want done. 2. That depends on the seller. "Actuator" would be a good place to start as long as the seller can spell. 3. A regular on/off switch won't work. The switch has to be 2 way (up/down) and reverse polarity (positive/negative - negative/positive). Autos use this type switch for electric windows. Simplicity sells the switch, and aftermarket switches are readily available. As Roger stated, there are Acme thread and recirulating ball types. Basically, there is a tube inside another tube. When the motor turns in one direction, the inner tube comes out (longer). When the motor turns in the other direction, the inner tube goes in (shorter).

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Stoneheartfarm
Dutch What I'm looking at is adding it to my B210 so I don't have to keep manually hoisting the deck and plow blade. I'm wondering if I couldn't use the regular hydraulic attaching point to run the center lift. It occurs to me that the throw there can't be very great, perhaps 5-6" at maximum? What happens if the actuator is longer than that? Damage to the actuator? For the price, and apparent ease, I'm sold. I'm just trying to figure out what size I would need and I'll start haunting ebay. With 1000 lbs of lift, I can probably figure out lots to do with them. But, lifting that deck and plow blade seems like a good starting point. Steve

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johnmonkey
It sounds like you need to know the throw and size of the hydraulic cylinder that is used on the tractors. Are the dimensions of the hydraulic cylinder and the actuator cylinder the same, could they be interchanged and used in the same amount of space? Just some thoughts, John H

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Dutch
Steve, Certainly factory engineered parts are the easiest to install. When modifying a tractor, be prepared to design & fabricate your own mounting points, components, brackets, etc. An actuator can be shortened the same as a hydraulic cylinder (cut & weld). The actuator’s clutches and/or limit switches can be reset to whatever you need. Your best bet is to get an actuator, take it apart, and play around with it. Most important, don't be afraid to "think outside the box." Just because the factory did something one way, doesn't mean that's the only way.

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thedaddycat
As near as I can tell, the electric lift on my 3310 uses the same mounting points as the hydraulic lift would. The switch to operate the electric actuator is a "double pole, double throw, spring return to center" switch. The actuator is wired to the center pole, and 12 volt DC is applied to the other two sets. Wire it for reverse polarity on opposite ends of the switch. I got a lighted one for marine applications, more costly but I hope it will last longer since it is very sturdy.

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arnoldir
For Ebay searches, I've had most luck with "actuator" but ocasionally one will be hiding under "Screw Jack". Double Poll - Double Throw - Momentary Contact switch rated for at least 15 amps is the way to go as stated above. got 20 amp sealed ones from grainger for $20 each. One point to mention is that not all of these actuators have a built in limit switch, but all should have an overload clutch that will protect the gearbox when the screw reaches the end of stroke. However, the clutch will wear out before anything else if you routinely run it till the clutch slips. It's better to have a little extra travel and use an indicating do-dad on your linkage to define the limits.

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Dutch
Steve, You'll be very lucky to find an actuator that will fit exactly without some sort of modification. I don't know how the hydro cylinder mounts on a B-210, or if an electric lift was even offered for that model. On the Simplicity tractors that did offer an electric lift, there are 2 lugs on the outer tube for mounting the gear box end. I suppose the idea is to fit an actuator with a longer throw into a smaller mounting space. I've never seen an aftermarket actuator with those lugs. They were probably custom made to Simplicity's specs. The other end is a simple hole. With a torch and welder, anything is possible!

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