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johnmonkey

Mower deck-pulley removal

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johnmonkey
I have a simp mower deck (MFG# 990784) from a 3410 that needs new pulleys and while I'm at it I was going to replace the fafner bearings. I tried to remove one of the pulleys and I thought I was doing great (I used a puller on it) until I looked at the pulley and it was bent real bad. Does anyone have a good method of removing rusted pulleys? (PS I rebuilt my gardenmark mower deck last year and it had cast pulleys on it was real easy to apply alot of pressure on it). Thanks John H

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UCD
To pull steel pulleys you need a pulley puller it is an adjustable collar that goes around & under the pulley and you hook your puller to it. It distributes the force evenly on the pulley. Hope this makes sense. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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Kent
I did something similar when I rebuilt my deck 3 years ago. I ended up removing the arbors and taking them to a dealer and had him press the shafts out of the pulleys, instead of pulling the pulleys off the shafts. You can remove the 6 bolts around the arbor and remove the arbor with the pulley still on it... The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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johnmonkey
Thanks Kent I was wondering if you could remove the whole arbor with the pulley attached ( It looked like it because the large hole where the arbor attaches). UCD are the pulley pullers different from a wheel puller? My wheel puller has two arms on it that have a bent end that can hook around and under a pulley. Where can you buy a steel pulley puller? PS Thanks for the quick response guys. John H

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UCD
Using this collar is the same as putting it in a press. You should always use a collar when pulling any type of pulley or gear. they should also be used in a press. It distributes the force evenly around the gear or pulley. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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richp
On some of the wimpier pulleys out there ( just about everything today) I use an air hammer/chisel. I grab the pulley with one hand and pull while hitting the shaft with the air hammer. Almost always works.

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UCD
John You use your 2 jaw puller with this collar This collar has 2 long bolts with 2 sliding plates with a hole in the center that slides on the bolts It goes around the shaft like so (0) You open it up or take it apart and slide it under the pulley then squeeze it together with the long bolts. You then hook your 2 jaw puller to the collar and pull. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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Kent
UCD, Is the collar you're talking about the same thing as a bearing splitter? I've wondered if using one of those with a puller would work... Kent The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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UCD
Kent I guess you could call it that. The hole in the center is tappered to get in between things and when tightened up would force things apart. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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johnmonkey
Thanks Maynard, I have seen what you are talking about but did not know what they were for. I have probably seen them at yard sales and passed them up because the same reason. Thats why I am a Jack of all trades but master of none. This is a great example of why this site is so GREAT!!! I hope I didn't break any eardrums!! John H

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Kent
That's what I thought Maynard was describing. Here's a link to one at harbor Freight http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=3979 I wondered how well they'd work for pulling pulleys. I have a 2 or 3 jaw puller to use with it... The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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UCD
I told you guys it takes me an hour to explain something that only takes 10 min. to do. LOL I like to say I know everything about nothing and nothing about everything. This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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KSever
Or you could have the pulleys that I have on the little deck I just picked up for free. This guy decided that he didn't want his pulleys coming off and drilled all the way through the pulley and arbor shaft, threaded the hole and put a hardened bolt through the whole thing. Then cut off the head of the bolt, I'm thinking he thought it would keep them balanced without the head of the bolt sticking out. I had to cut the pulley's in half with the sawzall to get them off. This was real fun trying to cut hardened bolts without messing up the arbor shaft. Kris

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HubbardRA
I have one of the large bearing removers as Kent illustrated. I have used it for pulling several items and it works very well. When ordering one of these, you will need the largest one if it is to be used in removing the pulleys. Rod H.

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acjohn
I just went thru the same ordeal with the 42" deck on my 410. I tried everything, heat, heat and quench, air hammer all with no luck. I used what maynard suggested and pulled the sheave flanges off the hub. It took about 5 ton to break the hubs free from the shaft. I would have had better luck if the flange for the blade was the splined type that goes on the arbor shaft. Mine were one piece shafts. I replaced all 4 sheaves with cast replacements from my local bearing house. I reassembled with anti sieze so if I EVER have to do it again, they will come apart easy. Good luck.

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