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Gasoline.....?

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Just curious, what kind of gas are you folks running in you machines? I run premium unleaded in my newer broadmoor but i wonder if i should run non-ox or leaded in my 7016, i was running regular premium in the yeoman thinking, guessing thats what it would require. (being so old). I have always wondered what effects this newer gas has with so much alcohol. any comments? Doug

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PatRarick
I have been running regular, no lead, 10% ethanol for the past 10 years without any problems. Some claim that you should run either leaded or add a lead substitute to unleaded fuel used for older engines. Since I haven't had problems, I leave well enough alone. I have learned that many (not all) complaints about ethanol can be traced to another source, such as an engine that had weak valves, weak carb diaphragms, dirty fuel tanks and carbs, or water in the fuel to begin with. My personal opinion is that ethanol, due to many false accusations by "big oil", has become a scapegoat for engine problems. The only thing I have noticed, is that one of my Chrysler mini vans loses about 2 miles per gallon on ethanol. This is curious, since the vans are the same year, same engine, same transmission, same options, and similar mileage. Pat

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HubbardRA
As I remember from my childhood, the small engine manufacturers have always recommended unleaded fuel, even back when Amoco was the only one selling unleaded. With the low compression ratios of all small engines, 87 octane is plenty. At 9:1 compression, 89 octane is needed. At about 10:1 premium 93 octane is needed. NASCAR at 14:1 runs 110 octane. You don't need a higher octane unless the engine "pings" under load. Running too high an octane leaves fuel unburned and will cause carbon in your engine. Higher octane fuels burn slower, yet higher compression ratios make the fuel burn faster. The two need to match. If everything else is right, the best performance will come from the lowest usable octane. Rod H.

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a7117puller
ok, older motors need to be converted from leaded gas to unleaded. The older motors are addicted to the leaded gas. You need to change the valve seals(if any), minor valve work, and some of that kinda stuff.

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