Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
thedaddycat

Yes, it really is that easy.....

Recommended Posts

thedaddycat
In order to fabricate and bend the support plates for the best fit and function, I decided to strip the 3310 back down to the frame again. I already had the back half (BGB and back) removed, this shows how easy these tractors are to work on. Hood-2 bolts, 5 electric treminals, carburator-2 bolts and a clamp each on throttle and choke cables and the fuel line, gas tank-2 bands and the other clamp on the fuel line Now all it takes is is the four motor mount bolts and two more on the drive shaft and Mr. Briggs is in your lap. Then unbolt the steering arm from the gear and pull the axle pivot bolt and the whole front end comes off. I will probably make a few other modifications while it's this far apart, like making a new tube for my beefed up axle pivot bolt so I can put the grease nipple on it, and changing the wiring harness slightly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thedaddycat
Alright then, this is what I'm doing this for. After I broke the lower bolt castings out of the BGB, I decided to build support plates. This is the second version of them, going from the electric lift mounting bolts all the way back to the transmission. The two small plates will be bent to fit on either side of the frame cross member that the front of the BGB mounts too. The BGB bolts will hold both of them to the frame and they will hopefully be a tight fit side to side if the bending goes well. Since the rear cross plate will relocate the BGB slightly farther back in the frame, I need to have the cross plates done first to accurately locate the holes for the lift mount bolts and rear running board bolt(all rear holes are matched to the original plates already). Once those are set, I'll add two bolts to the front cross plate and one to the rear. That means putting three holes per side in the frame. I'll weld the nuts onto the inside of the cross plates after everything's bolted up tight. This will sandwich the frame between the side and cross support plates with six bolts on each side. The rear (BGB and back) will have at least nine bolts per side in pre-existing bolts. I will also weld some bar stock to the inside of the original side plates to brace the back of the BGB and keep it from shifting should the bolts loosen. I haven't decided if I want to try finding safety bolts or drill these for lock wire, but if I do, I KNOW the bolts won't come loose! My question to you all is this: Does this look like it would be heavy enough? Could it support a loader being added to the 3310? Right now I have the JBJr., but that's how I broke the BGB in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kent
Of course we won't know until you really stress test it, but by bridging from the front frame to the rear frame rails, I think you've solved what IMO is "the weakest link".... I'm sure you've thought of this, but I'd make sure that the bolt holes are very precise, so there's absolutely minimum chance for "slop" or slippage.... The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dutch
Kirk, That's quite a pictorial. Your photos are great! Nice and sharp, and just the right size for screen display and they load quickly. Kent should consider making this a permanent addition in Simple trACtors. You remind me of me. Getting involved in major projects in the dirt and rocks while the shop goes unused. TIP > Get yourself a piece of plywood, and wear knee pads (those pebbles always find the most sensitive spot).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thedaddycat
Roy, I was just re-reading(thanks to UCD) some posts. The bolts I'm talking about are all blind, that is they bolt directly into the BGB or transmission so there are no nuts. I used removable strength Loc-Tite before(the blue stuff, I'll look up what number formula it is and post that after I get home) and they still worked loose enough to let the BGB move enough to break out the lower bolt castings while doing admittedly strenuous work with my JBJr. I suppose I could get or make retaining washers(the kind you bend a tab up on against the flat of the bolt head) but lockwiring the bolts seems like the most fool-proof method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thedaddycat
I used Loc-Tite 242, the blue removable strength formula. Perhaps I needed to use a stronger formula due to the vibration and/or exposure to oil. I work in a power plant, 600# superheated steam, 25 megawatt generation capacity, air, water, heating and cooling all utility services to a manufacturing plant. I have 3 double stack consoles and 2 stand alone computers on my end. In the last 4 nights I've read all 10 pages of posts here(in the Talking Tractors forum) and probably a third of everything on the ST part of the site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    • Jr.lll
    • SmilinSam
    • BLT
    • kwt
    • a_sannine
    • TTDE419
    • DougAcord
    • Ronpage
    • Bill725
  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Recent Status Updates

    • Dean McFadden

      Dean McFadden

      Good morning peeps! I’m always searching for helpful information with my AC collection. Hope to find out new information and pass on my own experience in restoration. Here are some pics of my babies. I’m still looking for front rims for the 410 so yesterday I put the 310 wheels on took it for a drive. Working pretty good but still needs some carb work. Gotta get the 310 running next. Have a great day!😁
       

      · 1 reply
    • thedaddycat

      thedaddycat  »  SmilinSam

      It's in pretty sad shape, but yes I have a yellow plastic cap that I'm fairly certain is what you need. PM me your details and I'll get it out to you.
      · 0 replies
  • Adverts

×