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ReedS

Hydraulic lift problems

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ReedS
Recently aquired a 67 landlord 2110 with a hydraulic lift which doesn't hold in the up postion(front), seems ok in the down (down pressure). Checked fluid level(ok). I've spent an hour or two looking here and at ST for info on this system. Has anyone had similar problem and if so how was it resolved? From the info that I seen it would seem as though the seals in the piston are likely worn altough there are no external leaks that I can see. One other problem is that it dosen't lift as much as I thought. I was pushing some gravel and couldn't lift without backing away from the small pile that I was pushing.My manual lift was able to do as much as I could lift and was expecting more from the hydro. Also is there info on the brand of the pump.valve and cylinder? I know this is a long post. but i haven't seen much on this subject relevant to my particular problem. Thanks in advance reeds

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Kent
Reed, I'm not sure of the specs on the hydraulic lift, but I'd guess it's capacity without a counterweight to be definitely under 300 lbs and definitely over 200 -- maybe 250. I'd guess the curvature of the blade was trying to lift the gravel, so it wouldn't lift it... If you have a rear lift and can put a counterweight on it, you'll see a marked improvement, though these things still aren't loaders.... Unless I'm mistaken, the pump is made by Cessna... don't know about the rest. Here's all the specs I have... http://www.simpletractors.com/attachments/hydraulic_lift.htm If the seals on the cylinder were leaking, you's see oil. I'd guess the bypass valve is bypassing... You could try stretching the spring or replacing it with a stronger one. See, you shouldn't have beaten me to the punch after all... Just Kidding! The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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MikeES
It could be as simple as broken o-rings in the valve spool. Especially if it works in one direction and not the other. The bad o-ring allows leakage so the lift does not hold and loses pressure (loss of lifting power). It could also be spool alignment/linkage. Where the spool does not travel to the correct position during lifting and does not center in the correct position. Good Luck! Mike S.

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ReedS
Kent, thanks alot !! No I mean thanks for the reply, I was really thinking that the seals in the cylinder were bypassing and was hoping that A) some one has had one of these things apart B) that someone might know were to locate the proper part(s)to repair it. As to the counterweight I haven't tried that yet, was hoping that I wouldn't need it. As to the bypass valve, where is it and what does it look like? I knew that the lift didn't hold when I bought it just didn't know that it wouldn't hold for even a couple of minutes!!!

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Kent
Reed, I don't have any first hand experience, but I think it is a ball-type valve on the pump, just behind the controls... You could probably see it in a parts breakdwon. Kent The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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ReedS
Ok, Kent I'll bite. Where would i find a parts breakdown for it? I searched ST but maybe I missed it. reed PS i meant to sign my my last post but hit the wrong button. ooops.

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thedaddycat
The counterweight helps balance loads at both ends of the tractor. This shows the extension I made for more leverage along with a Simplicity counterweight and a collar weight. I was trying different combinations to get the best (counter)balance between a full and empty Johnny Bucket Jr. Too little weight and the electric lift worked hard at lifting the full bucket. Too much and lowering the bucket(lifting the counterweight) did the same. I also used perf plate between the lift rod and the rear lift so I could adjust the angle of the rear lift by pulling a clip and moving the rod to a different hole. To the best of my knowlege the 3300's were the last to directly counterbalance the front and center/rear ends of the lift.

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Kent
Reed, Unless I'm mistaken, the parts manual for the 10HP Landlords has it. I know it shows both hydraulic lifts, but I'm not sure if it shows the internals of the components... Kent The foot-draggin' Clubhouse Custodian...

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BenB
Reed If you go to http://WWW.simplicitytechpubs.com and do a search for the parts manual for a mfg. #990435 (Sovereign 3012v) you will find the parts breakdown for the power lift unit. I believe it is the same as used on the 2110. Looks like the relief valve is located on the bottom of the pump at the front. The cylinder assembly contains three o-rings, one at each end and one on the piston. The control valve also contains two springs and two check ball type valves. Hope this helps

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ReedS
I just thought I would say thanks to all who have responded to my questions. I think that I now have enough info to feel comfortable about disassembling the piston and such. I can only hope that these O-rings are some sort of standard size so that they can be had easily. Does anyone know if they are or aren't ? Thanks Reeds

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powerking_one
Reed, Click on this link for the parts/operator's manual for the hydraulic lift kit (MFG # 990468). http://www.simplicitytechpubs.com/6767PRINT/PDF_files/TP_400_1297_00_AT_S.pdf Click on this link for the parts/operator's manual for the tractor (also includes two different hydraulic lift breakdowns). http://www.simplicitytechpubs.com/6767PRINT/PDF_files/TP_100_1319_01_LL_S.pdf Like we had PM'd each other, NON of the hydraulic pump, lines, or cylinder parts are active/good numbers. There may be some NOS out there though. Good Luck. Tom(PK) PS, If you find anyone that has some used parts, could you let me know their name?

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Dutch
Reed, There are basically only 2 things to consider when trouble-shooting a hydraulic system (PSI and GPM). PSI (Pounds per Square Inch) determines how much a system can lift. GPM (Gallons Per Minute) determines how fast the system can work. PSI starts at the pump, then is regulated by the relief (by-pass) valve. If a pump can develop 10,000 PSI, but the relief valve is set at 300 PSI, 300 PSI is all you will get. Most relief valves can be adjusted either by a screw, by shims, or changing springs . To measure PSI, you must use a guage. GPM also starts at the pump. To measure GPM, all you need is a bucket and a watch. Hydraulic systems are designed by engineers. Poor performance can be: 1) A slipping belt unable to turn a pump. 2) A worn pump unable to deliver fluid as designed. 3) A worn or mis-adjusted relief valve. 4) A restriction in valves (not opening all the way), or hoses (collapsed internally, or filter (clogged). 5) An external leak (can be seen). 6) An internal leak (can not be seen). System pressure is applied to a cylinder by the control valve (up - down). On double acting cylinders, high and low pressure is switched from side to side (up - down) by the control valve. A double acting cylinder can have an internal leak that can't be seen (high pressure bleeding over to the low pressure side). You must use a guage to determine if that is a problem. Any competent hydraulic shop either has "O" rings, or can make them.

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ReedS
Once again thanks guys. As soon as my wife lets me spend the day in the garage with the tractor(s)(LOL) I'll take all of this information and put it to good use. I'll post an update once I have taken the ole girl apart let you all know what I find. Reeds

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