Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
gretsch

Condensers

Recommended Posts

gretsch
Is there any difference theoretically between a Briggs and a Kohler condenser? Since a condenser is basically a battery, it seems like they would probably be interchangable but I'm not sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thedaddycat
Here is a set of articles you may find interesting. http://www.simpletractors.com/service/electrics/electrical_systems.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
powerking_one
Butch, All condensers do the same thing/work the same way. It is a capacitor. There are 4 physical factors to consider: 1. Case size/style/mounting tab or bracket 2. Capacitance (generally .15-.30 microfarads for battery coil or magnetos) The value chosen depends on the coil's primary inductance. 3. Voltage rating. Usually in the 100-400 volt range. Generally all engine ignition condensers are in this ballpark and not to worry about this. 4. Wire style, length, and what kind of terminal it has on it. Bottom critical line is: The condenser's CAPACITANCE is MATCHED to the COIL to yield maximum point life and minimize point arcing. Hope this clarifies, Tom(PK)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dutch
Butch, Condensers have been the subject of debate in previous posts. The following are my beliefs. Take them for what they are worth. I am sacrificing complete technical accuracy to provide a basic understanding. 1) A condenser is not like a battery. A battery makes electricity through a chemical reaction. There are no chemicals in a condenser. A condenser does not make electricity. 2) A condenser holds or stores electricity made by a coil or magneto. 3) A condenser can be good (works), bad (doesn't work), or wrong for the system. 4) If a condenser is right for the system, the points should last a very long time. 5) If a condenser is wrong for the system, metal will transfer from one of points to the other. 6) Condenser capacity (how much electricity is held) is measured in microfarads. 7) Condensers are designed (selected) by engineers to work the best with various systems. 8) Many manuals explain the theory of ignition systems and condensers, and include pictures and charts. Condenser capacity can be analyzed by examining the points. If metal transfers from positive to negative, or negative to positive. That indicates a condenser that has too much or too little capacity. 9) Bottom line........ It is not important to understand the theory of condensers to repair an engine successfully. (Just use an OEM condenser)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
To back up what Dutch and Tom said, most capacitors will work because they are all in general within a fairly broad range. That is why sometimes the points last much longer than others, if you just happen to have a good fit of the capacitor. You can use a B/S capacitor with a Kohler coil. I have that exact setup on one of my engines. Ran it all summer. Haven't had any problems. I also installed an automotive condenser on a B/S engine last summer. It ran great also. I have been mixing and matching these parts for years with no major problems. Only problem is that if the capacitor size is wrong, your points will not last very long. Rod H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×