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Tacey

Sheared-off bolt

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Tacey
This bolt happens to be sheared off in a motorcycle frame, but the principle is the same as if the bolt was in a tractor. I have been to the 'big box' stores, a.k.a. Lowes, Home Depot, etc., and they sold me a drill bit with a carbide tip and an 'E Z Out' to back out the body of the bolt. This bolt must be 'hardened' steel because all I can do is barely countersink it (it attached a crash bar to the frame.) Any experience with this, guys? Thanks. Tacey

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PatRarick
I use a washer with a hole slightly smaller than the diameter of the broken off bolt. I weld it to the sheared of bolt, through the hole. I then weld a nut to the washer unscrew the bolt with a wrench. Pat

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MPH
Tracy, sounds like you have a crome or stainless steel bolt. Run into those on door hardware . Been told it takes a cobalt bit to drill them. I'd say try Pats method..MPH

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Tacey
Since I don't have welding gear, I guess I'l hafta let a pro handle this one. As usual, you guys are the best. Thanks for the quick feedback. Tacey

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CC
Before you give up I have one more thing to try. If you can find a left handed cobalt drill bit. Or any left handed bit the proper size. When the bolt binds up in the bolt it will un-thread itself. I hope this helps. CC AC 416H

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Spyder
I'm not sure that carbide should be used to drill metal, especially hardened metal. Most often carbide is used for masonry, concrete, brick with percussion drives. I would try a simple high carbon steel drill bit. You should have better luck with high speed steel. Home Depot sells one that is titanium coated, try it and see if it drills the stud better. DaveG

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powerking_one
Tacey, One other thing to consider/try. If cosmetic damage (a little burned off paint, chrome discoloration) is acceptable, you can take an acetelyne torch to heat the bolt area cherry red. This should remove the hardness from it. I broke off a tap in a blind hole on a cast iron Kohler block once. Thought that was the end of it. This method worked great, took a drill to the busted tap and it cut though; the likes of a grade 2 bolt. You could wrap wet towels around the surrounding area to minimize the heat spread/damage as well. Tom(PK)

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HubbardRA
Sometimes you can drill a hardened bolt with a variable speed drill and a small bit. Turn the bit about half the normal speed. If you can get the small bit through, then walk up to the right size hole with a series of increasing sizes. You should use high pressure and slow speeds to prevent burning up the points of the drill bits. Rod H.

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ka9bxg
Where I work we often get allen head bolts broken off.We use carbide concrete drill bits to drill them out use a slow speed and you can usally get them out.I offten use a left hand drill to get the soft ones out but you have to use a small drill first and let the bit dig in hard and can get them right out

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