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alanscott

Who knows hydraulics?

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alanscott
I have been rustling up stuff to put a logsplitter together. The ram I have is similar to this http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&langId=-1&catalogId=4006970&PHOTOS=on&TEST=Y&productId=24556 I was thinking about buying the pump and valve from them, these 2 items. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&langId=-1&catalogId=4006970&PHOTOS=on&TEST=Y&productId=472&categoryId=1503 http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&langId=-1&catalogId=4006970&PHOTOS=on&TEST=Y&productId=471 Are all these compatable? I know nothing about hydraulic systems so any tips would be appreciated. thanks Alan

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HubbardRA
I may not be able to answer all of your questions, but here is a link to a previous post containing the formulas for doing most of the calculations needed. http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=8161 Rod H.

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Dutch
All components you listed are compatible, and should be okay for a really small log splitter. The 11 GPM pump will do, but consider slightly larger. It will make cycling faster. You may have a problem with the cylinder (ram). 2 1/2" is pretty small. Log splitters usually use a minimum of 4". The 14" stroke could be another problem. A 12" long log is about all you'll be able to handle.

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RonT
I have the same basic setup on my log splitter. I think you may want to consider a bigger cylinder shaft dia. The two stage pump on a 8hp honda will create a lot of splitting pressure when it shifts in to High pressure it may bend a 1 1/2" shaft. Mine has a 2" shaft. My splitter will split just about any log that you can lift on it. If it wasn't for the 2 stage pump it would not be able to do half of the work it does. The detent valve is a nice feature to let you get another log while the splitter is cycling for the next log. Ron Thomas #3

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alanscott
The ram is one I picked up in at an auction, I think I gave 2 bucks for it. It'll slide both ways just by connecting it to my air compressor so unless it leaks, I think it'll work out. My fireplace is a free standing forced air unit and will only take about a 15" piece so everything stays pretty short. I have a pretty good sized pile of wood that's about 12 inches or so in diameter and this would be about as big I would split. I'm just getting too lazy to split it by hand anymore Since the fluid volume in the cylinder should remain pretty constant, will a 1 gallon reservoir tank be enough or should I build it a little bigger? Thanks! Alan

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doogie_ac61358
Hi Alan, It's not too often I get to throw my two cents into something technical, so here goes. If anyone thinks this wrong say something. The 1 1/2" shaft seems to be too small for what you described your use would be. Personally, I would go with at least a 2 1/2" shaft. You throw one hard chunk of wood into that and it may just bend on ya. Next find out how much fluid will be in the cylinder upon full extension(i.e. find the volume of the internal of the cylinder). Then keep about a gallon and a half or two gallons extra in the tank to avoid the oil overheating and ruining seals (that gets expensive, I used to work in a shop changing semis to dump trucks). The higher the pump rate the faster it will go, just don't get too high. Next look at the output pressure, too high and you'll blow seals for sure. With this size of cylinder I would use about a 1250psi. pump max. It shouldn't take all that pressure to move the ram through a piece of wood, but you never know. The link you gave does not show the working pressure, but they recomend it for your application. Hope this helps and doesn't confuse you. And thanks for bringing a topic that I feel comfortable throwing my ideas your way. Doug Freeman "Angel from above"

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Marion_Kerr
Here's my 2 cents worth. I have built a couple of different self-designed log splitters about 20 years ago. I would stay away from power steering pumps as most are the "vane" type. This means that they have the capability to "by-pass" themselves internally and usually do not put out more than 800lbs pressure. I would recomment at least a 20gpm gear pump. Gear pumps are "constant-dispacement" units. This means they will pump until somethings blows or are by-passed by the type pressure spring (ajustable or otherwise) built into the spool valve body. The ones I built ran at the by-pass being set around 2000 lbs. hyd. pressure. A 20 gal. pump and a 14 to 16 hp engine being used as a "single-stage" unit will produce around 60,000 foot pounds of pressure. Here's a few other items that are important. Use a wedge about one inch thick with the cutting edge angle machined at about 20 to 22 degrees. The existing wedge above rail should be between 10 and 12 inches in height. Cut your H-beam or Solid tube (whatever you use as the rail) out and mount and weld the wedge into it. Don't just set on top and weld it on. Angle your wedge toward the "pusher" and measure so the top of wedge is leaning one inch closer to the "pusher" than the bottom. This helps keep your log from pushing "up" and forces it "down" toward the rail. DO Not put any kind of rough material on the face of the pusher. Let the log keep itself centered while splitting. Much easier on equipment. I welded a collar inside the pusher on cylinder side that accomodated a large ball bearing (got the bearing from a backhoe/crane sales that was off a bearing from an old crane turntable) and centered the cylinder shaft into it. On the back side of the cylinder I made the mount so the edges of the cylinder body rested against it. What this does on both ends of the cylinder is keep all pressure off of the retaining pins that hold cylinder on. I could actually turn the pins while splitter was in operation. You'll never bend a pin by mounting cylinders in this method. This last one I made I used the same principle as the farmers Wheel-disk. I made the axle so I could lower the unit to the ground with the splitting cylinder. When it was in the up position the rail was 30" off the ground. When you were splitting logs you could handle, you were standing straight up and no back ache. When you lowered it to the ground you could roll the big ones on.. Use a "wide" rail mateial. I prefer a 10 to 12" H-beam" over an "I-beam" as they are webbed and stronger.

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Marion_Kerr
John, The fella I built that particular splitter for has passed away since. I don't have any pictures but, I'll contact one of his sons (think they still have it in the family) and get some pics and post em for anyone interested. Give me a few days and I'll make a trip and get some photos. M. Kerr

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alanscott
Thanks for all the help, I think I have it figured on how I am going to build it but there's a few more questions. I was planning on using the B-10 to power this thing but I came across a B&S I/C still in the box for $100, so I guess it will be self contained. So much for the brackets I built to fit the A/C. Does the reservoir tank need to be higher than the pump? Or will the pump prime itself. If the tank is lower than the pump, should I use a one-way valve on the suction side to keep the fluid from draining back into the tank? Should I put a magnet in the tank to catch any metal particles? I have a inline filter for the return line but should I plan on a screen mesh at the suction oulet? Will ATF work for the hydraulic fluid? If so Dino or synthetic? I have a 55 gallon barrel of Mobile 1 synthetic, it's kinda pricey but it's good stuff. Alan

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Roy
Alan, I have a large CNC grinder at work that uses Mobile SHC-26 for the hydrostatic way system. Strangely enough the machine builder, Magerle, uses Mobile DTE-24 for the hydraulic clamping system. Do not see why SHC-26 would not work just fine. My thoughts,

Roy

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powermax_paul
ATF sounds a little light but on the other hand, Mobile DTE-24 sounds a little heavy especially when it gets down to 0 to 10 degrees F. I've really had good luck with IH Hytran Ultra hydraulic fluid. It is a little heavy for my powermax hydrostatic, but it works beautifully in my Loader/Backhoe system.

Paul Kjorlie, The Norwegian

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slb04786
I've got a hydraulic question for all you officianado's. I am putting a hydraulic motor on my snowblower to turn the chute with. I bought a hydraulic motor on ebay that was supposed to be 1/2" NPT ports. When I got the motor I found that the ports are bigger than 1/2" and smaller than 3/4". I can thread a 5/8" flared fitting into the port but I can't find anything that will convert from that to 1/2"NPT. Anyone know what I have here. What do I need to ask for at the hardware?, farm supply?, or other store to convert this over to 1/2"NPT. All my hoses and couplers are 1/2"NPT. Thanks guys, Stan

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UCD
Stan Take it to the MPG store in PI and the guy behind the parts counter (brian is his name I think but not sure) should be able to fix you right up. He was real helpful when I needed parts to get the M running when I was up there in Sept. They do make adapters for flare to pipe and pipe to flare This & $1.00 might get you a small Coffee Maynard aka/UCD

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