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thedaddycat

Gear and Tranny questions

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thedaddycat
While going through the tranny, I noticed a lot of "glitter paste" in the cases when I first opened them up. Some of the gear teeth have quite a bit of wear, but I noticed that the gears could be flipped over and would go back on the shaft no problem. This is the back side with nice square edges. How advisable would it be to turn the gears over and use the good sides? How much would you need to relieve for reliable and smooth engagement?

The long keys aren't cheap, don't abuse them.

When I pressed apart the 1-3 pair it looked like it had been braized or something. Notice the copper color on all three parts. Does anyone know what this is? I was going to see how easy it would be to turn both gears over and use a benchtop finishing belt sander to grind the engagement faces. This same part from the 3310 has only the shifting fork collar pressed onto the smaller gear, the larger gear is loose on it.

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Roy
Kirk, If the gear teeth are centered on the gear hub and both sides are the same you should be able to turn the gear over on straight cut teeth with no problem. Bevel gear teeth will reverse the thrust direction if turned over so you have to make sure the assembly is designed to take thrust in the opposite direction. I might relieve the teeth to round the corners or make them slightly pointed. The purpose to keep the teeth from butting into each other "dead on" which keeps them from engaging. Sort of like a manual transmission when it won't go into reverse and you have to let the car roll or bump the clutch to align the gears to mesh together. Refer to my earlier reply regarding the copper color. Might be "furnace braze". Enough of my free thoughts for now. Value accordingly.

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thedaddycat
Al, I have the same part from the 3310. Only the shifting fork collar is furnace brazed to the smaller (first) gear. The larger (third) gear is loose and can move a shade less than 1/16". What do you think the best way to reassemble it would be? I can cut the keyway in the first gear shaft area to use a key between first and third. I could reheat with the O-A torch and get the braze to wick between the parts or even silver solder them. I think I'll bevel the clean edges slightly and flip the gears over when I reinstall them. You can see the gap here. The two gears are keyed somehow, and will not rotate seperately.

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