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rbozic

How Much Fluid in Rear Tires?

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tractormike
I would also advise you to use the non-toxic marine antifreeze. Car antifreeze has a sweet taste that attracts animals to it. Should you have a leak , it doen't take much to poison a small animal or a pet. On the two tractors I have fluid in I put in 6 gallons in each tire, which on a 23x9.5 x12 brings the liquid level just up to the valve stem when the stem is at the 12 o'clock position. my 2 cents worth Mike

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Kent
I have windshield washer antifreeze currently in one set, and the Marine/RV antifreeze in another set. Be aware that the WW antifreeze is flammable, and may not be as safe on rubber in the long term. I haven't had mine in but a couple of years, so it's too soon to tell the long term effects. I bought my Marine/RV antifreeze at Walmart for $2 a gallon, so it's not that much more expensive...

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Kent
You fill the tires to add about 45-50 lbs of "cheap weight" to each wheel for added traction. The fluid is: (a) cheaper than buying cast-iron wheel weights, (b) places the center of gravity lower than any other form of added weight (for added stability on slopes), and (c) is supposedly a bit gentler on the drivetrain since the fluid will move around in the wheel slightly when you start or stop.... You don't completely fill them -- you must leave some room for air to maintain the correct pressure in the tire. You fill them only up to the valve stem.

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rbozic
Not a dumb question...... The reason why you fill tires with fluid is to boost traction. I live in West Virginia and have hilly terrain to mow. I use wheel weights, but occasionally my rear tires spin. So, I am going to add fluid inside the tires to go along with the wheel weights attached to the tire rims. I am trying to get opinions on whether to use marine anti-freeze or windshield washer fluid in the rear tires. Which is best? Any advice is appreciated.

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Kent
You can either break down the bead on one side of the tire (tubeless mounted tire only) and pour it in, then reinflate the tire. Or, you can buy an adapter at NAPA (and probably other places) that fits on the valve stem (tube or tubeless mounted tire) and adapts it to fit the end of a water hose. Use a funnel on the hose or another adapter to fit the jug of fluid.

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Al
Hi, I wouldn't use ethelyene glycol, We used to use it and after about 3 years it softened the tires and the cords would separate and they would get all twisted and contorted with big gourds on the corners of the tread. In the late 80s when the Sun Runners came out and needed more traction, Simplicity recommended windshield washer fluid. We have used it for about 12 years with no problems. When the tire is filled with fluid, it should be no higher than the valve stem when the stem is on top with the rim vertical as when on the tractor. We break the valve stem side bead and pour in the fluid, put bead seal on the bead, set the bead and stand the tire up. When the tire is vertical, valve at the top, you should get air out of the valve. Tip the rim10 to 15 degrees you should get fluid. This is ideal fill level. Good luck, Al Eden

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roma3112
here is a nother ? for the masses, once you get the liquid in how do you get it out for mowing in the summer, or do you all leave it in. Unfortunately i dont have an extra set of tires and rims set up yet to leave 1 for snow and 1 for summer. john

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Al
Hi, Windshield washer fluid doesn't cause the rims to rust. Leave the fluid in for mowiing. We put fluid in about 50% of the new tractors we sell just for better traction on banks etc for mowing. Good luck, Al Eden

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UCD
John Go to a good tire store one that handles Ag tires for Farmers and they should be able to help you. Better yet take your tires to them and have them load them. The Tire dealer can load them With chloride (which i prefer as it is heavier use inner tubes) Windshield washer fluid or RV antifreeze with no hassle or mess to you.

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roma3112
thanks manard i will look around the area and see if there are any tire dealers close by that can take care of that for me. Living soo close to boston there are not too many "farming freindly" tire dealers in the area. Do you think that the cloride will put any unnecessary strain on the 3112h's rearend. john

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UCD
John I have had my tires loaded for 30 years. They have been on my 7790 for 17 years. Under normal use conditions you should have no problem. My tractor has a very easy life now but it did live a hard one for 15 years. I use to blow out 2 parking lots and an apartment yard with a steep drive and 5 other house driveways. Now all I do is my two driveways at my house. One is 40'X 10' the other is 75' x 10' and perfectly flat. It only takes me 15 min to do this.

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rbozic
Just to let everyone know, I did not use tubes. As long as the fluid completely covers the metal, then rust will not occur for years and years due to a lack of oxygen inside the tire. No oxygen = No oxidation The tire dealer simply broke down the tire seal on one edge and poured the windshield washer fluid into the tire. With the tire laying on its side he filled it approximately 90%. Then he added air to again obtain a seal. Rick

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mrcaptainbob
About twenty-odd years ago I had chloride put in the back tires (turf) along with tubes. Pretty pricey. But along with chains, I'd never have been able to do the plowing or snowblowing. Left the fluid in and the chains on even when mowin' grass. It was a great benefit climbing the hills. Didn't leave any marks in the lawn. However....I need to fill the newly acquired tractor, as well as fill one of the original tires of the old tractor, as age took it's toll and it gave out. There was a lovely patch of dead lawn where the chloride drained. And the mess it left on the tractor and rim! In a matter of minutes!!! any open metal had rust/corrosion on it! I'm going the pink antifreeze route this time around. I did pick up the 'tool' from the local Napa. They didn't know they had one, either, but it was hanging on one of those 'spin-around' racks. Under $14.....

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