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ReedS

I got retired today

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ReedS
My 2110 was a little tired after the last couple of snows. [img]http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/uploaded/reeds/DSCN0135m.JPG[/img] Fortunatly I had a pair of chen shins that were on the 700. They're not perfect but they'll be better than one in the pic. I was going to do a series on changing tires but my battery said not nowxx( Maybe later I'll shoot the finished product.Ok its later now and here is the finished job. [img]uploaded/reeds/dscn0138m.jpg[/img] It wasn't hard,no blood lost and now I can put some air pressure into these babys. Maybe over the week I can do a series on tire changing. happy tractoring ReedS

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IronPony
Reed, I would really like to see a series on changing tractor tires. Will they fit on a car tire changer? I would think they would be to small. I need both front and rear tires for my 712 but have put off because I'm not sure I know how to change them. Dan

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WiscTom
How to change lawn mower tires without the shop tooling set up? Its easy, take them to the shop. That way you neither waste a day struggling with them , nor do you loose any blood in the process. It is the only way i have found to get those nasty buggers to work.

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BLT
It's not really that bad. After you break the beads, you squish the tire to the center of the rim and then pull tire down to the center of the hub. And then with a little help from a certified screwdriver you can roll out the rim from the tire. Very little blood gets lost.

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goatfarmer
I mounted the front tires on my 3410 with no problems. I used a big bench vise,and a long bolt with a flat washer to hold the tire/wheel assembly in place.A little prying with a large screwdriver to release the beads was probably the hardest part.:D I might attempt the rears,but I have a regular manual tire machine that would probably work there.

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arjr111
Before I got this, there were many scraped knuckles. When I purchased new ags and tried to mount them, one got stuck half way on, and half way off. Didn't want to ruin the tire, so I brought them to the local Toro guy to mount, (gas station said they weren't set up for them), he charged me $100. to mount them, and put in tubes. I went ballistic. Then I bought one of these and never had a problem again. [img]http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos/34500-34599/34552.gif[/img] [url]http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=34552[/url]

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UCD
The rear tires can be done on a commercial tire changer. I did them on mine all the time. To break the front tires down at home if you have a 6 inch bench vice put the tire in the vice so that the rim is just above the jaws and tighten the jaws. You might have to rotate the tire a couple of time to break the bead all the way around. You can use a bumper jack to break the rears down and will also work for the fronts. Find a good solid place to jack against. A 2 x 4 spiked to a wall works good. Place the tire under the base of the jack with the edge up against the rim and operate the jack. Do this in a coupe different places around the tire to completely break the bead. You can use two tire irons or two large screw drivers to remove the tire from the wheel. Place one iron between the tire and the wheel and lever it toward the wheel center. Take the other iron and insert between tire and wheel a few inches over and push it toward the center of the wheel. the first iron should be loose now, take it out and continue the process around the wheel. Then do the same for the other bead removing from the same side. The secret of not getting stuck is to make sure the bead on the opposite side from where you are levering is in the center or smallest part of the rim. To reinstall a good dead blow or hard rubber mallet works good to hammer the tire back on. Start the tire on the rim and push the bead on around the tire with your hands as far as you can. Then use the mallet to pound it on the rest of the way around, making sure the opposite side is down and into the center of the rim. Another trick is to lube the tire beads with soap. Straight dish detergent works real good. Art, You got ripped off, On the high side it shouldn't have cost more than $30. for the pair. It cost me $40 to have the tire dealer come and take my rears off and have 2 two tubes put in and loaded and brought back to my house and installed on the tractor. You should have reported them to the better business bureau.

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arjr111
Maynard, you got that right. It only cost me $40, to have my two full size, ags. w/tubes, mounted on the rear, plus the two fronts, on my Oliver 60, upstate NY. And you are gonna think I'm pulling your leg. But, honest to goodness, the guy that did the tire changing had one good arm. That has gotta be one of the hardest jobs to do, even with two good arms!

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UCD
Art Was it the owner of the garage that charged you or was it a hotshot employee that pocketed $80.00. You can pull my leg, but make sure it's the left one because the right one you will be carrying away. LOL

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dyehrd
Just had tires on the front replaced on my 3414. The cost was 25 dollars per tire which included removal of the old and mounting of the new. This was at my local Goodyear dealer. For that price they can have it. Dropped them off on the way to work and picked them up on the way home. I never had much luck workng on the smaller size wheels anyway...

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arjr111
After I got the one ag stuck, I took the two rears to the local firestone, dealer, they said they weren't set up for them. Then, I took them to the local Patchogue, NY, Toro/Wheelhorse dealership/shop. Had to leave them for 3 days, and wait to get ripped off, big time. When the guy said $106 and change, you could have knocked me down with a feather. They must have figured, anyone dumb enough to get an ag stuck half-on half-off, deserves to get screwed. }:) Never bought another thing from them. Now, many tires later I love my mini-tire changer!

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Karl_Brandt
Two weeks ago I replaced one front tire on my Simplicity 3416H. My tire was not as bad as yours,but I wanted to save the tube before it blew out.My tire went bad on the outside.I put on a used tire and later have to change the other front tire. I got two new tires for spares now. Karl :D

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dtsr
I agree with Art. That mini tire changer works really well. I have mine mounted on my work bench and changing a tire is rather easy. The front tires on my Simplicity 2012 took a little longer. I had to inch the tire around several times to get the bead to break but it was better than taking it to the tire store. David

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gregc
I will be finding out how good that mini changer works. I'm going to change tires on my Big Ten and put AGs in back and the ribbs in front as soon as I have the time. I have seen that mini changer on sale for $19.95 and that's what I paid at Northern Tool. Greg

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upstatemike
I've wanted a mini changer for quite some time, but still continue to do without. A few times the vice wouldn't break the bead, so I had to resort to the log splitter to break them...Lubed is always easier than dry...

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PatRarick
I made a slide hammer type bead breaker. Works very well, even on the small wheels. I use the tire repair liquid, like "Slime", to lube the beads, particularly on used tires. It insures a good seal. Still gonna get one of those small tire changers. Even though the slide hammer works well, the tire changer should make it easier yet. Pat

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arnoldir
I once had a guy try and charge me $300 to press u-joints into a set of 4x4 front axle shafts. Turned out he was trying to bill me for his Emergency Room Visit because he was not wearing safety glasses and cracked a bearing cap and shot it into his eye. I was lucky to get my shafts back after handing over $150, but will never again leave parts without a firm written estimate.

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