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Oil pump and filter.??

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I am assuming that my briggs vanguard single cyclinder had an oil pump and filter for the following reasons: extend life of engine extend life of oil keep motor cooler Yet, look at my 25 year old briggs, splash pump, no filter. Does it really make that much of a difference?? someone educate me? Furthermore, the 16 hp is a very dependable motor, why would the design change? Why aluminum? Are the new motors better? Doug

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dirtsaver
Doug, you are right on reasons for oil pump/filter. As to the old briggs, they held up because of cast iron construction vs. aluminum(remember the early Chevy Vegas?). Aluminum is lighter, cheaper,and easier to recycle, plus if the new engines lasted as long as our old Briggs/Kohler/Clinton/Onan etc. How many new ones could they sell? There may be an advantage in cooling with aluminun blocks but IMHO it's not an even trade for longeviety. Larry

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Seems that way Larry doesnt it? And, are the new aluminums as re-buildable? I blew up the original brigs in my broadmoor (97 model), tore it down, no crank bearings......full of bushings???????? I ended up buying a new one from Tulsa...... Doug

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dirtsaver
I have not rebuilt anything in the aluminum block line myself but with the nature of aluminum warping when it gets overheated I'd say they are made to trash if very bad at all. Parts for engines are priced such that you'd buy a new engine as cheap as you could rebuild the new ones. Larry

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PatRarick
Doug, I have no doubt that the pressurized lube system with oil filter does extend the life of the engine and the oil. On my Vanguards, I change oil and filter every 50 hours. I change every 25 hours on the cast iron singles. The oil drained from the Vanguards is noticeably cleaner. From the cast iron singles, the old oil is black. On the Vanguards it is darker than new oil but you can still see through it. As Herb mentioned, you have to be aware of the difference between "pressure lubed" and "pressure filtration". On pressure LUBED engines, the oil pump forces oil to the bearings, then through an oil filter. All the oil in the crankcase has been filtered. On pressure FILTRATION systems, the engine is lubed by the splash type system, BUT the engine includes an oil pump which forces the oil through an oil filter. To me, pressure filtration is no more than a sales ploy. It takes the used oil from the engine crankcase, puts it through a filter, then dumps it in on the used oil. As aluminum blocked engines, there are two types. The "throw away" aluminum engines use a chrome plated piston running in an aluminum cylinder. Valves are running in aluminum valve guides. The crankshaft runs on aluminum bearings. In these engines, what are called valve guides and main bearings, are no more than finished holes in the aluminum block. Properly maintained, they are durable, but not nearly as durable as cast iron. The can be rebored and rebuilt, but they are often cheaper to replace. The other type of aluminum engine, such as Briggs I/C or Vanguard series, use aluminum for the block, but all moving parts are no different than the cast iron engines. You have aluminum connecting rods riding on cast iron crankshafts. You have aluminum pistons running in cast iron cylinders. The crankshaft is supported by ball and/or replaceable main bearings. They have replaceable valve guides. These are just as rebuildable as the cast iron engines, and the cost is little, if any more. A couple of things that can be argued, are the valve guides and the engine bearings. Some of the cast iron engines did not use replaceable valve guides. Like the aluminum engines, the "guides" were no more than finished holes in the block. The older model Briggs 19 (7.25 hp) and 23 (9 hp) used aluminum bearings on the PTO side of the crankshaft. The pressure lubed engines need at least one plain bearing to carry the oil to the connecting rod. I don't know if the new engines are better. Time will tell, but I think the high end aluminum engines, particularly with full pressure lube and oil filter, will at least rival the old cast iron singles. Pat

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TBOLT
Doug, briggs wants to sell you a $9.00 oil filter every oil change. I have a crown series 15 hp. on my new Husqvarna rider.That little filter sure is expensive, wonder if there's an automotive filter that would work on it? Might be worth looking into.

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PatRarick
Tony, Baldwin makes oil filters to fit the Briggs. They make both the long and the short version. Will check on the number when I get out to the shop today. Some Kohlers and Onans use the same long filter. Haven't checked the specs as far as relief valve, micron filtering, etc., as yet, but I have used the filter for a 2.2 liter Chrysler in a pinch. Will check that number also. Pat

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patrician12
Aluminum is cheaper and easier to cast.The furnance temperatures are monumentally lower for alu than steel.When casting such things as block there is a failure rate.Which means the metal didn't flow properly and the casting has to be discarded.On aluminum this is a nonexistant problem.Secondly if you ever looked at automobile engines,complex overhead cam cylinder heads cam only be aluminum steel will not flow like that.Same thing with our air cooled engines.Multiple cylinders,overhead valves and better running because intake ports can be more precise for flow.Some of these new generation engines are so smooth and quiet it is unbeliveable.Could you imagine the cost to cast a 2 cylinder iron engine?Are the aluminum engines better?When they run right they are great but aluminum can not be overheated ,it warps. However, in an air cooled situation like ours as opposed to water cooled auto engines ,it is perfect.Heat is exchanged and disappated at a much greater rate than cast iron.Don't you cook with cast iron because of it's heat retention?The down side on aluminum in most cases,AUTOMOTIVE TOO! it is difficult,impossible or cost prohibitive to rebuild.

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