Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Rubber cutting edge for 42" snow/dozer blade


stevenj

Recommended Posts

I thought I saw a posting talking about a plastic cutting edge on a front blade or grader blade but I couldn't find it tonight. Anyway, I thought I'd share a modification to the snow/dozer blade I've mounted to my B-210. I wish I could attach pictures, but since I don't have a digital camera I'll have to describe it the best I can. I have a concrete driveway and I was concerned about catching an edge and stopping the tractor and bending or breaking something. I didn't want to set the cutting edge high with the shoes because I wanted to scrape down to the surface so I thought why not make a rubber cutting edge, sort of like a windshield wiper blade. I tried to located a piece of 3/8" or 1/2" thick conveyor belt material but was not successful so I bought a rubber tailgate mat (about 1/4" thick) from the local tractor supply store. I then cut 2 strips about 3.5-4" wide and 42" long from the mat. I then sandwiched these two strips between the blade and the cutting edge letting the rubber extend down about 3/4-1" below the cutting edge. I had to use longer carriage bolts to attach the cutting edge. I used a standard twist drill bit to drill holes in the rubber. I have to say that it works great. I've been using it for about 9 years and have not worn out the original edge. It won't cut down into hardpacked snow but will scrap down to the concrete if you haven't driven across the snow. It needs the lubrication of the snow. I tried it out in the summer and on the dry concrete the blade starts to stick/slip and bounces and rattles, but not when you use it in the snow. When you push the blade forward, the rubber edge bends rearward. It is stiff enough to push the snow, but compliant enough ride up over the expansion joints on the driveway. I have never snagged an edge since I've been using it. I just want to say that this is a great site. Lots of useful information. Steve
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good deal Steve! Another good material is the mud flaps off a dump truck or semi. You can find used ones at most truck shops or sometimes alonside the road where they fall off. Now if only my drive was not gravel!! Larry
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is inginooity fer sure. Another idea with regard to protecting your concrete and screeding material while useing the grader blade, Is getting the 1" rubber that the horse stables use for the decks the horses stand on. This material is found at a mill supply in bulk You and I would have a time and a mess to attempt to cut 1 inch of rubber. It can be done but they have an electric knife that will do the job cleanly. To continiue Useing the method you described I'm thinking you sandwiched the blade between the strips of rubber. With the thickness of the rubber i am describing a backing of rubber may not be necessary but some good big bolts with big washers would be required. The bolts could be Studs welded to the back of the blade. That way no holes would be required thru the blade. 1" rubber may be to big That is what they use for screeding the gravel on the conveyor belts in the gravel pits and they last for years before they have to change them. They use 2 inch rubber also. I live in the gravel pit mecca. Porland Cement is mined or processed here in Oregon.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sold a front blade that had belting material on it to a friend of mine.He was going to put it back to original and did'nt after trying it.He said it worked great,especially when pushing gravel out of his grass in the spring that the snowplows had put there.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...