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Briggs 23D


jrosenboom

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Tore down a 9hp briggs this weekend. New rings & gaskets will hopefully do it. Anybody know the torque specs on this engine? I have had a hard time finding parts for it too. Seems to be a pricey engine to work with. I believe the tractor is a 314 Simplicity Landlord. Any info would be GREAT! THANKS! John
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John, Here is what I found in my Briggs & Stratton repair manual Head Bolt Torque 190 inch lbs. Rod Bolt Torque 190 inch lbs. That is all I could find, hope it's helpful.:)
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I still have a parts book on it and looks pretty close to the 233XXX. I would think that the cast iron values in the repair manual should still hold true.
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John, I have the same engine in my Simplicity Landlord 990314. My tractor was made in 1963.The coil went bad on the engine last year. I replaced the coil with a newer style coil and had to change to newer style flywheel also,now the tractor runs great. Karl:D [img]http://www.simplicityva.com/Image083.JPG[/img]
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Karl, Yours looks just like mine! Your is in much bertter shape! I think they are the same model. Mine had the black & white stripes on the center of the hood and side panels. Sandy Lake Imp. had a old style coil for me. Pretty expensive part! Thought I'd throw new rings and gaskets in it while it was apart. Should be a nice tractor when I get it restored!
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Karl, That sure is a beauty you have there I too have a '63-4 9hp although it is not quite as nice as yours. I'm not sure of it's exact year since the number plate was missing from the engine when I got it. Now if I could only get it to start using the starter.I also had to replace the coil on the engine if memory serves me right it was darn near $90(US).Boy was I glad it worked when I was done!:p
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I don't know why they get so much for those coils.I did find a place tht sells them for $50. Since I bought 4 of them last year and hope I do not have to but any for a while,Bob
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Thanks for the torque specs Mike!! That's what I was looking for!! Any other interesting facts on this tractor? The guy at the local briggs shop here said his book mentioned that these engines ran on gas or kerosene.. Sandy Lake had a used coil for me @ half the price of new. Great place to order parts from!
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John, these engines do run on kerosene. You need to use two head gaskets to lower the compression ratio. You needed either two fuel tanks or an original Briggs kerosene fuel tank. The original tank looked like the standard Briggs tank, but had two fill caps. The tank was divided inside(app. 75/25) to have two seperate compartments. The smaller compartment was for gasoline and the larger for kerosene. To run on kerosene, you started the engine on gasoline. When it was up to operating temperature, you closed the petcock under the gasoline section and opened the kerosene petcock. To shut the engine down, there were three ways. You could shut the kerosene petcock and let it run out of fuel. This was the most popular option, as you would shut off the fuel and walk away. All you had to do was open the gasoline petcock when you wanted to start it. You could shut off the kerosene and open the gasoline, allow it to run long enough that the engine was running on straight gasoline, then ground the ignition. This was the second most popular option. You would switch the fuel supply shortly before you were finished with the job at hand, then kill the ignition and the engine was ready for the next start-up. The least popular method was simply to kill the ignition, like any gasoline engine. That got to be messy, as you had to drain the carb so it could fill with straight gasoline for the next start-up. You lost some power using kerosene, the engine used more fuel per hour to produce that power, and the engines ran hotter. At the time, kerosene was much cheaper than gasoline. There was also a fuel, "distillate", that could be used in these engines. This was cheaper than kerosene, and was not as refined. Back when kerosene and distillate were cheap, there were water injection systems to put a spray of water in the carb when these engines were running. It allowed the engines to run cooler, and increased horsepower. I've seen these only on farm tractors, but have never seen one on a Briggs. Pat
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Don't really know how to answer that question. If you purchased the kerosene engine, the tank came already mounted from the factory. I know the tank was available seperately, but you also needed the fuel line with the "tee" to do the field conversion. I don't know if there was a kit available to do the conversion, or if you had to purchase the tank, fuel line, and head gasket separately. Pat
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This picture was taken in 2001 after the tractor was painted,engine rebuilt. Yes the invisable belts are the best kind,never have to be replaced,good excuse for not working in the garden.:D I have never got around to getting the decals for this tractor.;) One of the many tractors I have in my collection. Karl [img]http://www.simplicityva.com/tvgtp.gif[/img]
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