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gretsch

Muffler cleaning

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gretsch
Is there a good way to clean up a muffler that has heavy carbon buildup inside? This muffler is on a 4-wheeler I just rebuilt but I figure the basic techniques would be the same. It blew the rings which caused an excessive amount of oil to be blown out through the muffler. I have let it run repeatedly but the smoking begins as soon as the muffler gets hot. If I let it run long enough, the valves start rattling and it starts to idle down which I assume is the muffler becoming blocked. It will be fine after it cools off but will start again when it gets hot. Any advice is appreciated.

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MN_FISH
gretsch Can't help you on the muffler. Incase the email didn't work being I have trouble on this site I'm interested in your PowerMax 9020. Can you send me the info. about it & pictures? Thank you Wayne

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BLT
Short of soaking out gum with gas, running should eventually clean it out. Try loosening up muffler and let some exhaust 'sneak out' before it goes thru muffler. I have done that on some string trimmers when people complain of lousy running. Being two cycle and not run hard they plug up real quick. I just loosen muffler until engine will run wide open and then let it run for a half hour full tilt or what ever is required to 'burn it out'. Also note they will spit out sparks.

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HubbardRA
Check to see if the baffles on the muffler are removable. I have had some two stroke motorcycles on which the baffles were separate from the outside muffler and held in with a bolt or a series of screws. Look at the end of the muffler to see if there is a removable section. On one two stroke bike that we had, the owner's manual recommended that the baffles be removed and the engine run for a short time under load and at higher rpm to blow the carbon out and the baffles could also be scraped and cleaned with a wire brush. Many two strokes had this feature.

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Hoss
My brother had the same problem on a 2 stroke ATV. What he did is put it in his outdoor wood burner and left it "cook". It did a great job burning out the carbon and oil build-up and the machine started and ran great after words. I am not sure how he kept it from getting too hot and warping but after all it is made to get hot just needs to get hotter to burn off all the gunk.

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gretsch
Thanks ya'll. It is a four stroke and doesn't have removable baffles (usually only on 2-stroke models). I did have a dirt bike that I had from when it was new. After a couple of years of hard riding,it lost it's power especially at high rpm's. The dealer identified it as clogged baffles and "burnt them out" which I did not understand completely but involved filling them with oxygen and them doing somekind of acetylene mixture to "poof" it out. It worked but I doubt that could be done on an enclosed muffler without blowing up.

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G.Kiebler
i would chech the muffler again,I'm real sure there is a baffle at the rear of the pipe.I had a honda in which one bolt held the baffle in place. Did you have to bore the engine?, if so you may have to adjust the slide needle to deliver more fuel,it may be running too lean.

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Stoneheartfarm
quote:
Originally posted by Hoss
My brother had the same problem on a 2 stroke ATV. What he did is put it in his outdoor wood burner and left it "cook". It did a great job burning out the carbon and oil build-up and the machine started and ran great after words. I am not sure how he kept it from getting too hot and warping but after all it is made to get hot just needs to get hotter to burn off all the gunk.
I've done something similar to clean stovepipe. Take the pipe off, stand it up against a snowbank and shove some newspaper into the bottom end. Then just light it and stand back. Steve

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gretsch
Gary, this one doesn't have removable baffles (the local shop told me usually the 2-strokes have those) but maybe others do. It has a bolt on the lower exhaust port but it is for blowing/cleaning out the muffler much the way my Bobcat has on it's exhaust. I did not have to bore it out, it was well within specs though the piston had to be replaced. Thanks for the input.

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