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"Calling Jeff Nemes-calling Jeff Nemes" are you go


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Hey Jeff, are you going to give your tid bit's on getting our tractor's ready for the deep freeze work of plowing-blowing-or just plain playing in the "SNOW" with them. Like the suggestion's you posted about getting our tractor's ready for summer. Some of us already know what to do to get our tractor's ready but other's might not and beside's it sure dosn't hurt to have a refresher course. Thanks->happyjack<-
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I have an opinion here. GAS There seems to be as many people who say drain your tank as keep it full. I vote for full with treated gas (Sta-Bil, or whatever you want to use). Reason? 1. Minimize surface area of gas to air, which minimizes evaporation of the volitile. 2. Reduce, or really eliminate the possibility of rust forming in gas tank. 3. Keeps oxidation from forming on internal aluminum carb surfaces (which requires disassembly and complete cleaning to cure). 4. Ability to hop on the tractor on a good day for a spin around the yard!!!!! OIL Agree with Jeff, go to a 10-30. 5-30 if you're really in the cold. Remember, this seems backwards, but the first number is the cold viscosity rating, and the second number is the warm viscosity. So, when it's cold, and your engine is challenged to turn over, having a lower cold viscosity will make it easier, and get the oil flowing to the critical components faster (if your engine has an oil pump). As the oil heats up, the molecules change from straight to curvey, and thicken the oil right up, getting to the viscosity you need for good oil pressure (again, with an oil pump). BATTERY If you want to maximize the life of the battery, keep it charged. The best way is to use a low current battery tender that has a charge sense circuit. You just keep it plugged in when not in use, and the charger automatically keeps the battery charged. These usually run $30, so they're a little pricey, especially since you can't use them to charge a dead battery. So, this needs to be owned in addition to a 2/6 amp charger. TIRES Check you air pressure regularly as the weather changes. Air pressure is temperature dependent; as the weather cools, the pressure drops. So 8-12 lbs in the summer can become 4-6 lbs in the winter (OK, I just made those numbers up, but you get the idea...just check them more than once a year!) I think that's it for my opinion. I'd like to know if there is a better air filter for use in the winter, considering that most "winter engines" I've seen (like snow throwers) don't have any air filter, since it tends to freeze when it sucks the snow into it, richening the engine right up. I'd hate to run my tractor without one, but maybe the paper ones are better for winter use than the foam??? Greg
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My Snowblower kit came with a shield that covers the air cleaner opening on the outboard side of the tractor, leaving the holes nearest the engine open. I guess that allows it to draw the warmer air from around the engine, as well as keeping snow out. Since it came from an older tractor than mine, I had to drill a new hole for the air cleaner screw, but it works fine.
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My HB212 came with a shield that wrapped around the muffler and extended over the air cleaner. This shield no longer works with the present muffler, but I had to make one as "No carb . freezing with it. But lots of problems without it." I also put a heavy cloth "canvas" on the left side of the engine covering the lower carb and govener linkages as I had trouble with these freezing up also. NOTE: be sure to keep this away from the muffler. This tractor has a full factory cab and the side covers do not cover this area. With these modifications I have no trouble blowing snow even in the worst [-30] conditions. MS
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Gee Jack - thanks. The only thing I can think of is: 1. Change to a mutigrade 5w30 or 10w30 for temps between 0-30 degrees. 2. Pump up front tire psi to 20-30 lbs for better "load" steering. 3. Check trans and all PTO belts (for thrower guys). Maybe have spares on standby. Make sure trans belt has a little slack in the clutch adjustment. Check with DLC to see if he has the one you need on sale. 4. Before running a tractor thrower, turn the belt by hand (with engine and PTO OFF!) and make sure the belt hasn't seized onto the driven pulley from long term storage. 5. Any units that have been sitting for an extended period - make sure they are operating correctly BEFORE you will need to use them. Gas can go bad rather quickly in some cases, fouling the carb and spark plug. Owners that mow, vac, till, plow, throw, tow and have fun all year round will not have this problem - sounds like you Jack! :) 6.Install proper carb and/or vent shields (as mentioned in following replys) 7. In order to get snow chains on tightly, sometimes lowering the tire pressure will allow easier chain installion - then as the tire is reinflated the chain will tighten nicely. There is not too much worse than having a chain come off in the middle of a snow storm. :( Also if you have ever wondered why they put the tire valve stems inboard - it makes it easier to inflate when wheel weights are on the other side.
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