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jrosenboom

Engine Pulling

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jrosenboom
Well I broke my engine pulling record last night. I traded a 23d briggs to Mwells and found a ride to NE for it. Of course the guy going to NE was leaving this morning and I didn't find out untill 1/4 to 9 last night. I get up for work around 4:30-5 so I wasn't looking forward to putting my shop clothes back on to pull the engine out. It was just another one of those things that isn't that bad in reality, but for some reason you get it in your head it's a pain in the rear! 10 minutes after opening the garage door I had the engine out, my tools back in my toolbox and I was loading the briggs into a pickup! The engine was in a running early B10 with every bolt in place. That's pretty good time considering a few months ago when I pulled my first engine out it took me about an 1 1/2 hours.

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HubbardRA
Sounds like you are NASCAR pitcrew material. Went on a Boy Scout Campout. Alternator died just as we got to the site. Our leaded took me to get another one. When we got back, he went fishing. Ten minutes later, my son and I walked up beside him with our fishing gear. He asked if I gave up, and was surprised to find that I had installed the alternator, jump started the engine from his truck and charged it enough to start on it's own. My son and I were both working on a pitcrew at a local circle track at the time. Gets you accustomed to doing things very fast.

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Bunky
Yes I would have to say that's pretty fast to pull an engine... And I know what you mean I have a 101 out back that I got for parts that I keep thinking of pulling the engine out of but Dredthe idea and half of this one is unhooked LOL..

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Kent
10 minutes... Wow! I personally don't like pulling and reinstalling driveshafts -- they're a pain on the older B-series and equivalent tractors, because they're so hard to get to, without disassembling the tractor. Just went through that to replace a broken hydraulic pump belt on the Big Ten... If only I was half as fast putting something together that I am tearing it apart, I'd be happy! :D

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jrosenboom
quote:
If only I was half as fast putting something together that I am tearing it apart, I'd be happy!
I have that problem too!!:D I can take ANYTHING apart!! The driveshaft is easy to unhook but a pain to get back together! That's one of those deals where you get the engine bolted in, go back to hook up the driveshaft, and find it's wedged in and you have to unbolt and slide the motor back out!!:(!

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BLT
Or when you get things done in crack time, patting yourself on the back on how well things went and the last thing you have to do is tighten up the starter belt and notice it is still on the floor. Doooooooooooooh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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sask
It takes me a lot longer to take apart something I haven't done previously than put it back together because I am paranoid about: 1. breaking something that will cost an arm and a leg to replace 2. taking something apart and having 50 springs, ball bearings, or other small unidentified pieces of metal fly across the shop with no clue how to get them back into whatever it was I just took apart 3. I like to draw elaborate diagrams that tell me where everything was before it is in pieces. I learned this one from doing the water pump on a Ford 2.8; 4 different lengths of 1/2 bolts are used (9 or 10 in total), and I didn't have a clue which one went in which hole. Of course, I didn't think about that until I had the sealant and gasket on the pump and was holding it in place on the engine. On the other hand, after all the problems I have had with an updraft carb on a Briggs recently, I can now take one off the engine, dismantle it, reset the float, get it back together and on the engine and test run it in about 6 minutes.

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