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arjr111

Another tiller question

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arjr111
I am thinking of taking my B10 and tiller upstate. Catskill area. The ground on my property and the whole area, is inundated with rocks. Dig a few inches in, and you are bound to hit a rock. Makes for hard digging and planting. Anyone use their older tractors with tillers, in this type of ground? How do they fare? Does this heavily rock saturated ground do damage to the tractor or the tiller? Thanks.

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MPH
Art, I've done a lot of rock embeded soil tilling around here. With my old Troy built it would leap-frog when I hit a good one, thus takinng some of the jolt off the machine. Last year I learned the 725 didn't jump, too heavy. While tilling up a rocky mess for a friend my model 19 started blowing oil out the crank seal, the opinion here on the site was the jagging caused it, plus puts a lot of stress on the BGB. If you gotta do it, run your tiller belt a tad lose so it will slip instead of locking up, belts are cheaper then torn up BGB's or engine cranks...MPH

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jlasater
I bent some of the tines on the tiller behind my 716H. I flat-out will not till really rocky ground for anyone anymore. You might want to look at one of the Brinly moldboard plows.

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MPH
Art, never have checked too see if they would bolt on but Troybuilt used to make rock tilling tines. Never have used them, they look like a rotory hoe used by farmers for early, small weed kill..MPH

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thedaddycat
My vote is for running the moldboard plow through first if you want to till. Here's a shot of the area I live in, taken from where they're doing road work about half a mile from my house. As you can see, the earth is about 80% rocks by volume around here. A good 5 or 6 foot iron bar works wonders for pulling the "iceburgs" out.......

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BLT
Helped my son this morning loosen up an area, 27 X 27 so he could flatten out a slope to put up a swing set for my grandaughter. Did the first part with a turn plow to loosen things up. This brought a lot of baseball and golf ball size rocks, not to mention hooking a good size on once or twice, and we cleaned up what we could. Then put the tiller on to grind it down. Well it did it but shook the H___ out of everything. Have the older tiller so kept the second belt loose in case the tiller hooked something it couldn't handle. And I had to suspend tiller to about half of its depth so it wouldn't get worse then what it was. I was amazed that I didn't bend the lift rod. I told him for any more grading around his place, rent a D-4 or so with a rock blade.

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